For a while – Bodrum

“All human wisdom is summed up in two words: wait and hope.”  – Alexandre Dumas

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“We never live; we are always in the expectation of living.” ― Voltaire

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“There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison” ― Jane Austen, Persuasion

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“Waiting hurts. Forgetting hurts. But not knowing which decision to take can sometimes be the most painful…” ― José N. Harris, MI VIDA: A Story of Faith, Hope and Love

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“If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.” –  Oscar Wilde

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“After you find out all the things that can go wrong, your life becomes less about living and more about waiting.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

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“I’ve learned that waiting is the most difficult bit, and I want to get used to the feeling, knowing that you’re with me, even when you’re not by my side.” ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

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“Waiting is a means of acquiring patience.” – Adrian Thatcher

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“Knowing someone isn’t coming back doesn’t mean you ever stop waiting” ― Toby Barlow

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“For a while” is a phrase whose length can’t be measured.At least by the person who’s waiting.” ― Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

 

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“When you create art, the world has to wait.” –  Will Smith

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Waiting for the next Summer

“Wait long enough, and people will surprise and impress you.” –  Randy Pausch

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge – Waiting 

Flowers, Sun and Wonders – Bodrum’s Streets Structure

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Bodrum  is a district and a port city in Muğla Province, in the southwestern Aegean Region of Turkey. It is located on the southern coast of Bodrum Peninsula, at a point that checks the entry into the Gulf of Gökova, and is also the center of the eponymous district. The city was called Halicarnassusof Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Built by the Knights Hospitaller in the 15th century, Bodrum Castle, overlooks the harbour and the marina. The castle grounds include a Museum of Underwater Archaeology and hosts several cultural festivals throughout the year. The city had a population of 36,317 in 2012.

Bodrum was a quiet town of fishermen and sponge divers until the mid-20th century; although, as Mansur points out, the presence of a large community of bilingual Cretan Turks, coupled with the conditions of free trade and access with the islands of the Southern Dodecanese until 1935, made it less provincial. The fact that traditional agriculture was not a very rewarding activity in the rather dry peninsula also prevented the formation of a class of large landowners. Bodrum has no notable history of political or religious extremism either. A first nucleus of intellectuals started to form after the 1950s around the writer Cevat Şakir Kabaağaçlı, who had first come here in exile two decades before and was charmed by the town to the point of adopting the pen name Halikarnas Balıkçısı (‘The Fisherman of Halicarnassus’). (Reference: Wikipedia)

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge