Variations on a Theme – Old Market Square, Nottingham

Nottingham Simona Prilogan

Nottingham 1 Simona Prilogan

Nottingham 2 Simona Prilogan

Nottingham 3 Simona Prilogan

Nottingham 4 Simona Prilogan

Nottingham 5 Simona Prilogan

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge – Variations on a Theme

Live your beautiful life! While there is life, there is hope! 

Happy weekend, wherever you are! 🙂 

Cheeky

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Hunedoara, Romania

“I am a great believer that anything not expressly forbidden is explicitly allowed.” – Garth Nix, Clariel

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Bodrum, Turkey
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My father’s rabbits, Romania

“You stole my heart the day we met, and I’ve never asked for it back.” – Shirley Jump, The Christmas Baby Surprise

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Deva, Romania

“Your smile is half-asses, Mr. Moore” – Aubrey Morgan, Sadistic Affair

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Nottingham, UK

Parents spend the first part of our lives teaching us to walk and talk, and the rest of it telling us to sit down and shut up.

War doesn’t determine who’s right. War determines who’s left.

If you think things can’t get worse it’s probably only because you lack sufficient imagination.

You can’t be late until you show up.

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Hunedoara, Romania
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Bodrum, Turkey
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Nottingham, UK
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Nottingham, UK

Knowledge is realizing that the street is one-way, wisdom is looking both directions anyway.

Optimism: Waiting for a ship to come in when you haven’t sent one out.

Never interrupt your opponent while he’s making a mistake.

You can go anywhere you want if you look serious and carry a clipboard. 

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Hunedoara, Romania

It isn’t homework unless it’s due tomorrow.

It may look like I’m doing nothing, but I’m actively waiting for my problems to go away.

Evolutionists have proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without any proof.

Every rule has an exception. Especially this one.

Love is like pi – natural, irrational, and very important.

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Mansfield, UK
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Hunedoara, Romania

 

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge, Cheeky 

 

Awake Heart

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“Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery – celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from – it’s where you take them to.” –  Jim Jarmusch

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“There were people who went to sleep last night,
poor and rich and white and black,
but they will never wake again.

And those dead folks would give anything at all
for just five minutes of this weather
or ten minutes of plowing.

So you watch yourself about complaining.

What you’re supposed to do
when you don’t like a thing is change it.
If you can’t change it,
change the way you think about it.”
– Maya Angelou

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“Sorrow prepares you for joy. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place.” –  Jalaluddin Mevlana Rumi

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“When writers die they become books, which is, after all, not too bad an incarnation.”-  Jorge Luis Borges

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“What transforms this world is — knowledge. Do you see what I mean? Nothing else can change anything in this world. Knowledge alone is capable of transforming the world, while at the same time leaving it exactly as it is. When you look at the world with knowledge, you realize that things are unchangeable and at the same time are constantly being transformed.” –  Yukio Mishima, The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

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“When she transformed into a butterfly, the caterpillars spoke not of her beauty, but of her weirdness. They wanted her to change back into what she always had been. But she had wings.” –  Dean Jackson

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“An awake heart is like a sky that pours light.” – Hafiz

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“Only you can take inner freedom away from yourself, or give it to yourself. Nobody else can.” – Michael A. Singer

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“Scared and sacred are spelled with the same letters. Awful proceeds from the same root word as awesome. Terrify and terrific. Every negative experience holds the seed of transformation.” – Alan Cohen

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In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge, Transformation

Live your beautiful Life! While there is Life, there is Hope! 🙂

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Experimental by nature

“Life is an experiment in which you may fail or succeed. Explore more, expect least.” 
– Santosh Kalwar

“No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.” –  Albert Einstein

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Deva, Romania

“All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” –  Ralph Waldo Emerson

“It’s much easier on the emotions when one sees life as an experiment rather than a struggle for popularity.” – Criss Jami

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Deva, Romania

“See now the power of truth; the same experiment which at first glance seemed to show one thing, when more carefully examined, assures us of the contrary.”  –  Galileo Galilei

“Not only are there meaningless questions, but many of the problems with which the human intellect has tortured itself turn out to be only ‘pseudo problems,’ because they can be formulated only in terms of questions which are meaningless. Many of the traditional problems of philosophy, of religion, or of ethics, are of this character. Consider, for example, the problem of the freedom of the will. You maintain that you are free to take either the right- or the left-hand fork in the road. I defy you to set up a single objective criterion by which you can prove after you have made the turn that you might have made the other. The problem has no meaning in the sphere of objective activity; it only relates to my personal subjective feelings while making the decision.” –  Percy Williams Bridgman

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Romania

“The logic of the symbol does not express the experiment; it is the experiment. Language is the phenomenon, and the observation of the phenomenon changes its nature.” – Carlos Fuentes

“Like most arts, the link between the mind and the pen can chain you like an enslaved workaholic. Even on an intended vacation you suddenly have this killer urge to record whatever the vacation may teach.” – Criss Jami

“All progress is experimental.” –  John Jay Chapman

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Romania
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Romania

In response to The Daily Post- Photo Challenge, Experimental

Live your beautiful life! While there is life, there is hope!

 

Glow

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Newstead Village, UK
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Bodrum, Turkey

“It is easy to see the glow but hard to recognize the awakening of silence.” –  Dejan Stojanovic, The Sun Watches the Sun

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Newstead Abbey, UK

“Grace and beauty originates from within. It is the spirit’s light that glows out and make every-thing beautiful” – Angie Karan

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London, UK

 

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Lahore, Pakistan

“Do whatever makes your spirit glow out loud.” –  TemitOpe Ibrahim

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Nottingham, UK

“Music brings a warm glow to my vision, thawing mind and muscle from their endless wintering.” –  Haruki Murakami, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

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Newstead Village, UK

“Glow wherever you go and let the light of God reflect in the world around you. You carry the light of God and wherever you pass, darkness must flee.” – Israelmore Ayivor, Become a Better You

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Newstead Village, UK
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Deva, Romania

“We are philosophers of our time
Floating in the moon’s evening glow” 
― Richard L. Ratliff

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Nottingham, UK

“Rekindle the glowing spirit for success in your heart. Refresh your mind with possibility thoughts and never give way for your passion to drink from the cup of tiredness. Be renewed in your thoughts every single day.” –  Israelmore Ayivor, Shaping the dream

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London, UK

“Shine, shine, shine tonight- It’s time to let it show- Burn bright, light the fire- That leads the way to hope- The Maker of the stars lives in our soul- We have His light, what are we waiting for- Get out and glow.” – Moriah Peters

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Newstead Village, UK

“Every day, strive to refine your contagious shine, and shake the nonsense offered by those who lack the will to polish-up from within.” – T.F. Hodge, From Within I Rise: Spiritual Triumph Over Death and Conscious Encounters with “The Divine Presence”

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Newstead Abbey, UK

“We are like the moon. The moon shines anyway, but it does not produce its own light. It reflects the light illuminated onto its surface by the Sun and is never proud to say “I am the source of light”. God shines through us, hence He deserves the glory; not us.” –  Israelmore Ayivor

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Newstead Abbey, UK

“On the rocks of a bay so blue, it made her gray eyes glow.” – A. LaFaye, Water Steps

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Nottingham,UK

“We like to admit to only that which already glows, although it is nobler to support brightness before it glows, not afterwards.” – Dejan Stojanovic, The Sun Watches the Sun

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Bodrum, Turkey

“Friends are like the stars that glow in the sky… you don’t always see them, but you know they’re always there overhead, and even when it’s cloudy, snowy or stormy, even when the power goes out and you’re trapped in darkness, they’ll always find a way to shine through to you.” – Rebecca McNutt, Smog City

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Newstead Abbey, UK

“There are two kinds of light – the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.” – James Thurber

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Nottingham, UK

In response to the Daily Post- Photo Challenge, Glow 

There is no such thing as size

 

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St James’s Park – London

 

“To experience sublime natural beauty is to confront the total inadequacy of language to describe what you see. Words cannot convey the scale of a view that is so stunning it is felt.”  – Eleanor Catton

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London

“Prosperity is no just scale; adversity is the only balance to weigh friends.” – Plutarch

 

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Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire

“Between shortage and absolute poverty an ocean of shades and gradations do emerge on the scale of deficiency. Be that as it may, each stage must find a mode to leave a door ajar for the sun to peer in and human warmth to radiate. ( ” Homeless down in the corner”)” –  Erik Pevernagie

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London

“All space is relative. There is no such thing as size. The telescope and the microscope have produced a deadly leveling of great and small, far and near. The only little thing is sin, the only great thing is fear!” –  David H. Keller

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Newstead, Nottinghamshire

“The scale can only tell you what you weigh; not who you are.” –  Steve Maraboli

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Nottingham

“Nothing is so small that you cannot cut it in half” – Ulf Wolf

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London

“Do not let one negative carry the same weight as ninety nine positives.”- Kamil Ali

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London

“Life is like music on a scale, moving up and down. When your life is over, you have written your song.” –  Peggy Toney Horton

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London

“Your purpose…should always be to know…the whole that was intended to be known.” – Maimonides

 

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Bodrum, Turkey

“Get Off The Scale!

You are beautiful. Your beauty, just like your capacity for life, happiness, and success, is immeasurable. Day after day, countless people across the globe get on a scale in search of validation of beauty and social acceptance.

Get off the scale! I have yet to see a scale that can tell you how enchanting your eyes are. I have yet to see a scale that can show you how wonderful your hair looks when the sun shines its glorious rays on it. I have yet to see a scale that can thank you for your compassion, sense of humor, and contagious smile. Get off the scale because I have yet to see one that can admire you for your perseverance when challenged in life.

It’s true, the scale can only give you a numerical reflection of your relationship with gravity. That’s it. It cannot measure beauty, talent, purpose, life force, possibility, strength, or love. Don’t give the scale more power than it has earned. Take note of the number, then get off the scale and live your life. You are beautiful!” –  Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free

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Hunedoara, Romania 

In response to The Daily Post- Photo Challenge, Scale 

October, Poetry and Newstead Abbey Gardens

 “Thro’ thy battlements, Newstead, the hollow winds whistle;
Thou, the hall of my fathers, art gone to decay.” – Lord Byron 

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Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, England, was formerly an Augustinian priory. Converted to a domestic home following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, it is now best known as the ancestral home of Lord Byron. 

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Sir John Byron of Colwick in Nottinghamshire was granted Newstead Abbey by Henry VIII of England on 26 May 1540 and started its conversion into a country house. He was succeeded by his son Sir John Byron of Clayton Hall. Many additions were made to the original building. The 13th century ecclesiastical buildings were largely ruined during the dissolution of the monasteries. It then passed to John Byron, an MP and Royalist commander, who was created a baron in 1643. He died childless in France and ownership transferred to his brother Richard Byron. Richard’s son William was a minor poet and was succeeded in 1695 by his son William Byron, 4th Baron Byron.

Early in the 18th century, the 4th Lord Byron landscaped the gardens extensively, to which William Byron, 5th Baron Byron added Gothic follies. It became a stately and glamorous estate. The 5th baron, known as “the Wicked Lord”, was eccentric and violent and ruined the estate. Lord Byron’s son and heir (also named William) eloped with his cousin Juliana Byron, the daughter of William’s brother John Byron. Lord Byron felt that intermarrying would produce children plagued with madness and strongly opposed the union. He also needed his son to marry well to escape the debt that had been incurred in the Byron name. When defied by his son, he became enraged and committed himself to ruining his inheritance so that, in the event of his death, his son would receive nothing but debt and worthless property. He laid waste to Newstead Abbey, allowing the house to fall into disrepair, cutting down the great stands of timber surrounding it, and killing over 2,000 deer on the estate.

His vicious plan, however, was thwarted when his son died in 1776. William also outlived his grandson, a young man who, at the age of twenty-two, was killed by cannon fire in 1794 while fighting in Corsica. The 5th Lord died on 21 May 1798, at the age of seventy-nine and on his death, it is said, great numbers of crickets he kept at Newstead left the estate in swarms. The title and Newstead Abbey was then left to his great-nephew, George Gordon, the famous poet, who became the 6th Baron Byron.

Newstead Abbey’s landscape owes much of its beauty to the River Leen, which feeds the lakes, ponds and cascades that ornament Newstead’s gardens. The grounds provide the perfect place for a relaxing outing all year round, with fabulous wildlife including peacocks, swans and geese.The Japanese Garden was laid out for Ethel Webb in 1899 by a Japanese horticulturist brought to this country for the purpose. Work on its creation continued until 1914, when the Great War began. This garden is intended to reproduce in miniature the main features of a Japanese landscape. Small stone bridges cross tiny streams and stepping stones lead to little islands. Stone paths wind past the remains of a thatched teahouse and a draw-well which was originally fitted with double buckets. The stone lanterns were imported from Japan by Miss Webb, together with much of the original planting. This included shrubs and dwarf trees such as maple, quince and conifers.A cascade overflows from the Garden Lake into the bed of the stream below and herons eat the crayfish that flourish there. At the far end of the garden are the remains of a Japanese door which, according to the 1916 guidebook, was once ‘crowned by a tiny roof of thatch, with an inscription in Japanese underneath’.

The Rose Garden, together with the Small Walled Garden, originally made up the two compartments of the Kitchen Garden built by the Wildmans. They were ornamented with fountains and covered two and a half acres. The Webbs built heated glasshouses here for growing grapes, peaches, melons and winter cucumbers as well as ferns, begonias and many other plants required for decorating the Abbey. Many thousands of bedding plants were also produced here annually for the Webbs. Instead of being grown in pots the seedlings were dibbled into small squares of turf, in which they were later transferred to the gardens.

The Webbs built the Gardener’s Cottage at the southeast corner of this garden in the 1860s. In 1965 the glass houses were demolished in order to make a rose garden which was re-designed in 1998. The door in the west wall of the Rose Garden leads to the Children’s Playground and Picnic Area, which are built on the site of the Kitchen Garden outbuildings.

 

The Great Garden is a formal garden of terraced walks descending to a rectangular pond and enclosed by stone walls. It is in the Dutch-influenced style favoured during the reign of William and Mary (1689-1702) and was probably created during that period. A painting dating from about 1726 by Peter Tillemans, on display in the Abbey, shows this garden very much as it is. The Eagle Pond, also known as the Mirror Pond, is surrounded by walnut trees and may have medieval origins as a monastic fishpond. It measures 300 feet by 100 feet. Parts of the North Terrace wall (behind the Herbaceous Border) are thought to date from the 14th century. Half way along its length this wall curves downwards to reveal the site of the Forest Pond (called ‘American Lake’ by the Byrons) which was drained in the 20th century.

Originally, the planting in the Great Garden was mainly evergreen, with fruit trees trained against the north wall. Potted orange trees were probably also displayed during the warmer months and taken into the Orangery (located inside the Abbey) during winter. The two lead statues of male and female satyrs are attributed to John Nost and were erected here by the 5th Lord Byron in 1784.

 

 

The ivy-covered stump on the lawn between the Garden Lake and the Abbey is all that remains of the oak tree planted by the poet Byron in 1798. He was ten years old at the time and had just inherited the estate and his title. Nearly a decade later Byron found the tree in poor health and wrote his poem To an Oak at Newstead. However, the tree recovered and because of its association with the poet became one of the greatest attractions for Victorian visitors.

By 1915 the tree was dying, attempts to rescue it were unsuccessful and it was cut down a few years later. Next to the stump is a small oak tree planted in 1988 by the Earl of Lytton, the poet’s direct descendant, to mark the 200th anniversary of Byron’s birth.

The poet Byron built Boatswain’s Monument and the tomb beneath during the winter of 1808 to 1809. They stand on the spot that Byron mistakenly believed to have been occupied by the High Altar of the priory church. The tomb was intended for himself and his Newfoundland dog, Boatswain, who died of rabies in November 1808. In the event, Byron was buried in the family vault at Hucknall and the dog’s remains have long since disappeared from this tomb. The monument bears an inscription, composed by Byron in tribute to his favourite dog who ‘possessed Beauty without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, and all the Virtues of Man without his Vices’.

“One shade the more, one ray the less,

Had half impair’d the nameless grace

Which waves in every raven tress,

Or softly lightens o’er her face;

Where thoughts serenely sweet express

How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.”

She walks in Beauty- George Gordon (Lord) Byron (1788-1824)

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(References: Wikipedia- Newstead Abbey , Newstead Abbey )

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge, Pedestrian

Windows to the Blue 

Letters are dancing through history’s book

With memories hugged in arms of its love,

In corner of thinking of what did they look

While writing the stories which flight with the doves.

 

 

 

Time is refreshing the files on the days  

When mornings are hugging the earth with their will,

When  passing the valleys of wonders  still pay

Some whispers through mind to the wish to fulfill. 

 

I’m running to dawns and catching my Blue 

When windows are eyes to  the letters of skies,  

While writing the stories and welcome them through 

A new stage of flying which shine blue and rise.  

@Simona Prilogan – October 2017

 

Regards from my ordinary Blue! 😘

In response to The Daily Post Photo Challenge – Windows 

For a while – Bodrum

“All human wisdom is summed up in two words: wait and hope.”  – Alexandre Dumas

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“We never live; we are always in the expectation of living.” ― Voltaire

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“There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison” ― Jane Austen, Persuasion

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“Waiting hurts. Forgetting hurts. But not knowing which decision to take can sometimes be the most painful…” ― José N. Harris, MI VIDA: A Story of Faith, Hope and Love

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“If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.” –  Oscar Wilde

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“After you find out all the things that can go wrong, your life becomes less about living and more about waiting.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

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“I’ve learned that waiting is the most difficult bit, and I want to get used to the feeling, knowing that you’re with me, even when you’re not by my side.” ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

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“Waiting is a means of acquiring patience.” – Adrian Thatcher

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“Knowing someone isn’t coming back doesn’t mean you ever stop waiting” ― Toby Barlow

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“For a while” is a phrase whose length can’t be measured.At least by the person who’s waiting.” ― Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

 

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“When you create art, the world has to wait.” –  Will Smith

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Waiting for the next Summer

“Wait long enough, and people will surprise and impress you.” –  Randy Pausch

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge – Waiting 

Flowers, Sun and Wonders – Bodrum’s Streets Structure

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Bodrum  is a district and a port city in Muğla Province, in the southwestern Aegean Region of Turkey. It is located on the southern coast of Bodrum Peninsula, at a point that checks the entry into the Gulf of Gökova, and is also the center of the eponymous district. The city was called Halicarnassusof Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Built by the Knights Hospitaller in the 15th century, Bodrum Castle, overlooks the harbour and the marina. The castle grounds include a Museum of Underwater Archaeology and hosts several cultural festivals throughout the year. The city had a population of 36,317 in 2012.

Bodrum was a quiet town of fishermen and sponge divers until the mid-20th century; although, as Mansur points out, the presence of a large community of bilingual Cretan Turks, coupled with the conditions of free trade and access with the islands of the Southern Dodecanese until 1935, made it less provincial. The fact that traditional agriculture was not a very rewarding activity in the rather dry peninsula also prevented the formation of a class of large landowners. Bodrum has no notable history of political or religious extremism either. A first nucleus of intellectuals started to form after the 1950s around the writer Cevat Şakir Kabaağaçlı, who had first come here in exile two decades before and was charmed by the town to the point of adopting the pen name Halikarnas Balıkçısı (‘The Fisherman of Halicarnassus’). (Reference: Wikipedia)

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge