For a while – Bodrum

“All human wisdom is summed up in two words: wait and hope.”  – Alexandre Dumas

21175469_423564801378255_1332728516_n

“We never live; we are always in the expectation of living.” ― Voltaire

21151564_423172351417500_7157082095614700852_n

“There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison” ― Jane Austen, Persuasion

21100972_423033208098081_807625896_n

“Waiting hurts. Forgetting hurts. But not knowing which decision to take can sometimes be the most painful…” ― José N. Harris, MI VIDA: A Story of Faith, Hope and Love

21150074_423605054707563_4557384762659681226_n

21151130_423564484711620_985170737_n

“If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.” –  Oscar Wilde

21077597_423603881374347_8565732057112278017_n

21106542_423603834707685_2491967570143615645_n

“After you find out all the things that can go wrong, your life becomes less about living and more about waiting.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

20170826_124931

“I’ve learned that waiting is the most difficult bit, and I want to get used to the feeling, knowing that you’re with me, even when you’re not by my side.” ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

21148652_423257381408997_1796888969_n

“Waiting is a means of acquiring patience.” – Adrian Thatcher

21105735_423172558084146_4184461468919559842_n

“Knowing someone isn’t coming back doesn’t mean you ever stop waiting” ― Toby Barlow

21151062_423257358075666_492665158_n

“For a while” is a phrase whose length can’t be measured.At least by the person who’s waiting.” ― Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

 

21148373_423006328100769_232417836_n

21106468_423603374707731_6584612813817419986_n

“When you create art, the world has to wait.” –  Will Smith

21175089_423564854711583_1460023135_n
Waiting for the next Summer

“Wait long enough, and people will surprise and impress you.” –  Randy Pausch

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge – Waiting 

Flowers, Sun and Wonders – Bodrum’s Streets Structure

21077725_423172604750808_700472519978001618_n21077321_423603168041085_8615422140079986945_n21078372_423603491374386_2314409504097652082_n21034372_423603251374410_5907863773024072898_n21034323_423172301417505_1993700784760618543_n21034398_423172661417469_3788572681615414242_n21032426_423172208084181_9025411269483244582_n

Bodrum  is a district and a port city in Muğla Province, in the southwestern Aegean Region of Turkey. It is located on the southern coast of Bodrum Peninsula, at a point that checks the entry into the Gulf of Gökova, and is also the center of the eponymous district. The city was called Halicarnassusof Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Built by the Knights Hospitaller in the 15th century, Bodrum Castle, overlooks the harbour and the marina. The castle grounds include a Museum of Underwater Archaeology and hosts several cultural festivals throughout the year. The city had a population of 36,317 in 2012.

Bodrum was a quiet town of fishermen and sponge divers until the mid-20th century; although, as Mansur points out, the presence of a large community of bilingual Cretan Turks, coupled with the conditions of free trade and access with the islands of the Southern Dodecanese until 1935, made it less provincial. The fact that traditional agriculture was not a very rewarding activity in the rather dry peninsula also prevented the formation of a class of large landowners. Bodrum has no notable history of political or religious extremism either. A first nucleus of intellectuals started to form after the 1950s around the writer Cevat Şakir Kabaağaçlı, who had first come here in exile two decades before and was charmed by the town to the point of adopting the pen name Halikarnas Balıkçısı (‘The Fisherman of Halicarnassus’). (Reference: Wikipedia)

In response to The Daily Post – Photo Challenge 

Palace of the Parliament

 

The Palace of the Parliament (Romanian: Palatul Parlamentului) is the seat of the Parliament of Romania. Located on Dealul Arsenalului in central Bucharest (Sector 5), it is the largest administrative building in the world  with a height of 84 m, an area of 365,000 m2 and a volume of 2,550,000 m3. In terms of weight, the Palace of the Parliament is the heaviest building in the world, weighing in at around 4,098,500,000 kg.

A colossal parliament building known for its ornate interior composed of 23 sections, it houses the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies, three museums and an international conference center. The museums hosted inside the Palace are the National Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Communist Totalitarianism (established in 2015) and the Museum of the Palace. Though named the House of the Republic (Romanian: Casa Republicii), after the Romanian Revolution in 1989 it became widely known as the People’s House (Romanian: Casa Poporului). Due to its impressive endowments, events organized by state institutions and international bodies such as conferences, symposia, and others take place there, but even so about 70% of the building remains empty.

In 1990, Australian business magnate Rupert Murdoch wanted to buy the building for US $1 billion, but his bid was rejected.  As of 2008, the Palace of the Parliament is valued at €3 billion ($3.4 billion), making it the most expensive administrative building in the world.  The cost of heating and electric lighting alone exceeds $6 million per year, as much as the cost for a medium-sized city.

After the earthquake of March 4th 1977, Nicolae Ceaușescu started a reconstruction plan of Bucharest. The People’s House was the center of this project. Named Project Bucharest, it was an ambitious project of Ceaușescu’s begun in 1978 as an intended replica of Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. A systematization project existed since the 1930s (during the time of Carol II) for the Unirii–Dealul Arsenalului area. Its construction was organized as a contest and won by Anca Petrescu, who was appointed chief architect of the project when she was just 28. In total, the team that coordinated the work was made up of 10 architects, which supervised a further 700.  Construction of the Palace began on June 25th 1984, and the inauguration of the work was attended by Ceaușescu.

The building was erected on the site of some monasteries that were demolished and on the site of Uranus Hill that was leveled. In this area were located the National Archives, Văcărești Monastery, Brâncovenesc Hospital, as well as about 37 old factories and workshops.  Demolition in Uranus area began in 1982. 7 km2 of the old city center was demolished, and 40,000 people were relocated from this area. The works were carried out with forced labor of soldiers and so the cost was minimized.

Between 20,000 and 100,000 people worked on the site, sometimes operating in three shifts. Thousands of people died at the People’s House, some mention a figure of 3,000 people.

In 1989 building costs were estimated at $1.75 billion, and in 2006 at €3 billion.

Since 1994 the building hosts the Chamber of Deputies, after the initial headquarters of the institution, the Palace of the Chamber of Deputies (now the Palace of the Patriarchate), was donated by state to the Romanian Orthodox Church. Since 2004 the Romanian Senate is headquartered in the building, originally housed in the former building of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party.

Between 2003 and 2004 a glass annex was built alongside external elevators.  This was done to facilitate access to the National Museum of Contemporary Art opened in 2004 inside the west wing of the Palace. In the same period, a project aiming to hoist a huge flag was canceled following protests from the public. A flag was already hoisted on the building, but was removed together with the support.

The restaurant, accessible only to politicians, was refurbished. Since 1998 the building houses a Regional SECI Center for Fighting Transborder Crime.

In 2008, the Palace hosted the 20th NATO summit. In 2010, politician Silviu Prigoană proposed re-purposing the building into a shopping centre and an entertainment complex. Citing costs, Prigoană said that Parliament should move to a new building, as they occupied only 30% of the massive palace. While the proposal has sparked a debate in Romania, politician Miron Mitrea dismissed the idea as a “joke”.

The construction of the Palace began in 1984 and initially should have been completed in only two years. The term was then extended until 1990, but even now it is not finalized. Only 400 rooms and two meeting rooms are finished and used, out of 1,100 rooms.

The building has eight underground levels, the last one being an antiatomic bunker, linked to the main state institutions by 20 km of catacombs. Nicolae Ceaușescu feared nuclear war. The bunker is a room with 1.5 m thick concrete walls and can not be penetrated by radiation. The shelter is composed of the main hall – headquarters that would have had telephone connections with all military units in Romania – and several residential apartments for state leadership, in the event of war.

The building has a developed area of 365,000 m2, making it the world’s second-largest administrative building, after The Pentagon, and in terms of volume, with its 2.55 million m3, it is the third most massive, after the Vehicle Assembly Building of the John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the Temple of the Feathered Serpent in Teotihuacan, Mexico. For comparison, it can be mentioned that the building exceeds by 2% the volume of the Great Pyramid of Giza, and therefore some sources label it as a “pharaonic” construction.

The building of the Palace of the Parliament sinks by 6 mm each year.  Romanian specialists who analyzed the data argue that massive weight and structure of the Palace lead to the settlement of layers below the construction.

The building was constructed almost entirely of materials of Romanian origin. The only exceptions are the doors of Nicolae Bălcescu Hall. These were received by Ceaușescu as a gift from his friend Mobutu Sese Seko, the President of Zaire.

Among them: 3,500 tonnes of crystal – 480 chandeliers, 1,409 ceiling lights and mirrors were manufactured; 700,000 tonnes of steel and bronze for monumental doors and windows, chandeliers and capitals; 900,000 m3 of wood  (over 95% domestic) for parquet and wainscotting, including walnut, oak, sweet cherry, elm, sycamore maple; 200,000 m2 of woolen carpets of various dimensions (machines had to be moved inside the building to weave some of the larger carpets); velvetand brocade curtains adorned with embroideries and passementeries in silver and gold.  (References: Wikipedia)

20170702_141615

Shelter my heart

18379570_371944219873647_2128405999_o

Shelter my heart with your smile,

Let rays of the hope meet the dove.

No years which matters are force

But light radiating through love.

 

Shelter my heart with your peace

While  climbing mountains to the top

The path might spread out and release

The calmness embracing the hope. 

10424259_1421494264792887_2437009012341925118_n

Wishes

12038068_917540351661255_1582783687454808031_n

What kind of tears
do the wishes face?
Lonely through my space
walk away from fears.

***

Dancing with the Faith,
singing to the Moon,
smiling always soon
to the Morning mate.

***

Get embraced by Sun
and washed by the Rain,
out of any Pain,
still Believe and Run.

***

Questioning the days
answering through nights
to my higher flights,
Wishes get their ways.

10424259_1421494264792887_2437009012341925118_n

New Horizon

Is Winter, is cold and is rain,

Through all our feelings. And nights

Are  coming to paint all the same 

With shadows, by sparks moon on lights. 

img_2403
Nottinghamshire, UK

Is question, is mind and is hope

Through all our thinking about.

Embracing the faith tight and cope

With life’s answers given to doubt.  

img_3745
Nottingham , UK

While digging the silence  and mind

I’m striving to see  eyes of truth.

I’m watching through space and regard

All mornings, fountains of   the  youth. 

img_3096
Dubai, Arab Emirates

 

10399427_1490688047873508_7880067917098605965_n
Bucharest, Romania

 

 

906084_1558224644453181_7125191287201268574_o
Derby, UK

 

1234333_225649810923191_1159196728_n
Deva, Romania

 

(https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/new-horizon/)

I’m stepping

 

 

15319120_291397224595014_2325930114974418947_n
London, UK

 

I’m stepping to play on my game,

While world from outside answers mind,

Through evenings I’m grabbing the frame

Of questions which hard tie me blind. 

11059443_10203325214605911_8057178659136376455_n
Hunza Valley , Pakistan 

 

I’m stepping to act on my dreams,

According to plan, worth desired.

The lights from inside caught my fears,

The shadows are playing so wired. 

11001783_1556135444662101_892081465958871480_n
Nottingham, UK 

I’m stepping  to sit on my table, 

While questions are  digging   my  space

Nor nothing, or all these, together, 

Embrace  me  on peace and relax. 

15232181_291401221261281_6981876419495302552_n
London, UK 

  Relax 

“Bopsy”

10424259_1421494264792887_2437009012341925118_n

Bopsy 

The 26-year-old mother stared down at her son who was dying of 

terminal leukemia. Although her heart was filled with sadness, she also 

had a strong feeling of determination. Like any parent she wanted her 

son to grow up and fulfill all his dreams. Now that was no longer 

possible. The leukemia would see to that. But she still wanted her son's 

dreams to come true. 

She took her son's hand and asked, "Bopsy, did you ever think about 

what you wanted to be when you grew up? Did you ever dream and 

wish about what you would do with your life?" 

"Mommy, I always wanted to be a fireman when I grew up." 

Mom smiled back and said, "Let's see if we can make your wish come 

true." Later that day she went to her local fire department in Phoenix, 

Arizona, where she met Fireman Bob, who had a heart as big as 

Phoenix. She explained her son's final wish and asked if it might be 

possible to give her six-year-old son a ride around the block on a fire 

engine. 

Fireman Bob said, "Look, we can do better than that. If you'll have your 

son ready at seven o'clock Wednesday morning, we'll make him an 

honorary fireman for the whole day. He can come down to the fire 

station, eat with us, go out on all the fire calls, the whole nine yards! 

And, if you'll give us his sizes, we'll get a real fire uniform made for 

him, with a real fire hat — not a toy one — with the emblem of the 

Phoenix Fire Department on it, a yellow slicker like we wear and rubber 

boots. They're all manufactured right here in Phoenix, so we can get 

them fast." 

Three days later Fireman Bob picked up Bopsy, dressed him in his fire 

uniform and escorted him from his hospital bed to the waiting hook and 

ladder truck. Bopsy got to sit up on the back of the truck and help steer 

it back to the fire station. He was in heaven. 

There were three fire calls in Phoenix that day and Bopsy got to go out 

on all three calls. He rode in the different fire engines, the paramedics' 

van and even the fire chief's car. He was also videotaped for the local 

news program. 

Having his dream come true, with all the love and attention that was 

lavished upon him, so deeply touched Bopsy that he lived three months 

longer than any doctor thought possible. 



One night all of his vital signs began to drop dramatically and the head 
nurse, who believed in the Hospice concept that no one should die 
alone, began to call the family members to the hospital. Then she 
remembered the day Bopsy had spent as a fireman, so she called the fire 
chief and asked if it would be possible to send a fireman in uniform to 
the hospital to be with Bopsy as he made his transition. The chief 
replied, "We can do better than that. We'll be there in five minutes. Will 
you please do me a favor? When you hear the sirens screaming and see 
the lights flashing, will you announce over the PA system that there is 
not a fire? It's just the fire department coming to see one of its finest 
members one more time. And will you open the window to his room? 
Thanks." 

About five minutes later a hook and ladder truck arrived at the hospital, 
extended its ladder up to Bopsy's third floor open window and 14 
firemen and two fire-women climbed up the ladder into Bopsy's room. 
With his mother's permission, they hugged him and held him and told 
him how much they loved him. 

With his dying breath, Bopsy looked up at the fire chief and said, 
"Chief, am I really a fireman now?" 
"Bopsy, you are," the chief said. 
With those words, Bopsy smiled and closed his eyes for the last time. 

Jack Canfield and Mark V. Hansen ( Chicken Soup for the Soul)

In response to the weekly photo challenge: Tiny

11066538_1388409584815453_4011927735110971803_n

img_40161

11150543_10203312011915852_2009096695396783189_n

12387963_1534328543555630_36500307_n

Chaos

“I accept chaos, I’m not sure whether it accepts me.”
― Bob Dylan

1239716_237588526403549_185406196_n
Ballymena, Northern Ireland 

“Our real discoveries come from chaos, from going to the place that looks wrong and stupid and foolish.”
― Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

img_3208
Rawalpindi, Pakistan 

“It’s a cruel and random world, but the chaos is all so beautiful.”
― Hiromu Arakawa

img_2805
Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

“It’s hard to believe in coincidence, but it’s even harder to believe in anything else.”
― John Green, Will Grayson, Will Grayson

13022284_143718542696217_144356915_n
Nottingham, United Kingdom 

“Life is nothing without a little chaos to make it interesting.”
― Amelia Atwater-Rhodes, Demon in My View

14302597_244170449317692_1095296844_n
City of Caves, Nottingham, United Kingdom 

“Chaos is what we’ve lost touch with. This is why it is given a bad name. It is feared by the dominant archetype of our world, which is Ego, which clenches because its existence is defined in terms of control.”
― Terence McKenna

img_2749
Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom 

“In chaos, there is fertility.”
― Anaïs Nin

img_3378
Mansfield, United Kingdom 

“If chaos is a necessary step in the organization of one’s universe, then I was well on my way.”
― Wendelin Van Draanen, Flipped

13765933_215598845508186_6355324109033660703_o
Nottingham, United Kingdom

“In the space between chaos and shape there was another chance.”
― Jeanette Winterson, The World and Other Places: Stories

img_2955
Nottingham, United Kingdom

“Chaos was the law of nature; Order was the dream of man.”
― Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams

img_2750
Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom 

“All the most powerful emotions come from chaos -fear,anger,love- especially love. Love is chaos itself. Think about it! Love makes no sense. It shakes you up and spins you around. And then, eventually , it falls apart.”
― Kirsten Miller, The Eternal Ones

1374236_244570829038652_499332564_n
Portstewart, Northern Ireland 

“Either we are adrift in chaos or we are individuals, created, loved, upheld and placed purposefully, exactly where we are. Can you believe that? Can you trust God for that?”
― Elisabeth Elliot

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/chaos/

Ridge (Transmogrify)

Night falls on my angles of miss,

Days  burning just trying escape, 

While asking the spring for the bliss, 

While drawing the hope into shape.

WP_20160205_19_45_24_Pro

The flowers turn round to the life 

The Stars are  dancing with Moon.

Whilst time through squares just flies

Still nothing to bring to the tune.

WP_20160205_19_44_05_Pro

I am seeking my own on the bridge 

Which drives  to the Sun, far away.

While running to catch  on the ridge

All  senses that kneel me on pray.

img_40111

img_4063114391015_251713645230039_584576351632147692_n12977103_135310183537053_5526739227963739414_oWP_20160205_19_42_52_ProWP_20160205_19_43_09_ProWP_20160205_19_43_21_ProWP_20160205_19_42_00_ProWP_20160205_19_41_43_Pro

(https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/transmogrify/)